My current reading list

I thought I’d share the books I’m currently getting through.

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What’s on your reading list?

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#bookreviewfri – Bitter Greens by Kate Forsyth

For this week’s #bookreviewfri,  @carole_m_scott reviews Bitter Greens:

Bitter Greens is the first ‘grown ups’ novel from prolific Australian children’s novelist, Kate Forsyth. It is a beautiful and spellbinding book, telling the story of three different women – a ‘Rapunzel’ locked away in C16th Venice, a scandalous aristocrat in C17th France, banished from court to a nunnery, and the nun who tells her stories to make her exile bearable. Kate’s writing is intoxicating and I found myself transported to the times and places she took me to. I was walking the alleyways of long ago Venice and I was trapped in the toxic but entertaining court of Louis XIV. The powerful, deviant and different women at the heart of the story made a refreshing change from the ‘all too good’ female characters that perpetuate in most literature and in addition, it’s a great page turner. Kate’s prose is gorgeous; it’s colourful, lively, sumptuous. I’d recommend this to anyone who wants to get lost in a complete world whenever they pick up a book.

Bitter Greens by Kate Forstyh

You can find Carole at her blog – Carole Scott – where she muses about life, travel and whatever springs to mind.

#bookreviewfri – Aleister Crowley: The Biography

This is what @saralhawthorn thinks of this biography on occultist Aleister Crowley for #bookreviewfri:

Aleister Crowley: The Biography by Tobias Churton

Crowley is arguably one of the most complex characters of recent years, surrounded by hype, hysteria and mystery. This book aims to debunk all the myths, focusing on the ‘real’ Crowley. However, whilst it does lay out a few facts and an illuminating account of alleged work as a spy, it’s a real chew to get through. I’m a fast reader, but the format is clunky, confusing and I found myself re-reading sections several times.

Read it only if you have an interest in the Crowley or mysticism.

Aleister Crowley – The Biography, Tobias Churton

Check out the rest of the reviews under the Friday Book Review tab.

Have you read this bio? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below or tweet @saralhawthorn or myself, @sarahrajabalee. Don’t forget to use #bookreviewfri.

Happy reading!

#bookreviewfri – The Night Rainbow

Looking for something different to read over the weekend? Today’s #bookreviewfri is from @talesfromaspace:

The Night Rainbow by Claire King

Set in a stunning, sun-baked French landscape ‘The Night Rainbow’, by Claire King, is a wonderful debut novel that immerses you in the world of bright, imaginative five-year-old Pea. She’s a character to fall in love with as she navigates her way through the adult world and the profound experiences those around her find almost impossible to confront. With her little sister Margot, Pea takes you on a journey you’ll be sorry to leave. An insightful and beautifully written treat of a book.

The Night Rainbow

Check out the rest of the reviews under the Friday Book Review tab.

Have you read The Night Rainbow? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below or tweet @talesfromaspace or myself, @sarahrajabalee. Don’t forget to use #bookreviewfri.

Happy reading!

Book Review Friday – The Poe Shadow

In case you forgot, today is Friday which means one thing here on teacup and cake – #bookreviewfri! @oandthefoxes reviews a novel which follows a young lawyer trying to solve the mystery of Edgar Allan Poe’s death.

The Poe Shadow by Matthew Pearl 
I can’t even give this book 1 star, boy how I loathed it. The writing was clunky particularly when dialogue was involved. It felt more a homage to Poe with crassly shoehorned passages of Poe’s work rammed in with very little thought taken to how this would effect the pace of the narrative. In a word AWFUL.
The Poe Shadow

Check out the rest of the reviews under the Friday Book Review tab.

Have you read The Poe Shadow? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below or tweet  @oandthefoxes or myself, @sarahrajabalee using #bookreviewfri

Happy reading!

Book Review Friday – A Swarming of Bees

Are you after a quick read? This week @saralhawthorn reviews a historical novel set in Whitby.

A Swarming of Bees – Teresa Tomlinson

Like UK history? A good crime/mystery story? Then I recommend A Swarming of Bees, set in 600CE (common era) in Streonshalh, the place commonly now know as Whitby. The pace is good, the characters interesting – both from a personal and historical perspective – and it’s a fairly quick read. Excellent for weekend reading.

 

A Swarming of Bees

A Swarming of Bees

Check out the rest of the reviews under the Friday Book Review tab.

Have you read A Swarming of Bees? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below or tweet @saralhawthorn or myself, @sarahrajabalee using #bookreviewfri

Happy reading!

Book Review Friday – Snake Ropes

Have you just finished your book and after a good read? Look no further; @talesfromaspace recommends this debut book on an insular and isolated island life:

Snake Ropes – Jess Richards

‘Snake Ropes’, by Jess Richards, is a stunning debut novel that weaves myths, folklore and the imagination into a spellbinding, original tale. Set in an island community the alternating narratives of Mary and Morgan knit together as the book progresses encountering keys that talk, boys who disappear and the mysterious Thrashing House. This is an intelligent, thought-provoking story that had me on the edge of my seat – can’t wait for her next one.
Snake Ropes

I’ve decided to collect all the reviews in one place so you can see what my friends and I have been reading. Find them under the Friday Book Review tab.

Have you read Snake Ropes? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below or tweet @talesfromaspace or myself, @sarahrajabalee using #bookreviewfri